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Isotonix® Calcium Plus

By Isotonix®

Sold by Isotonix®

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Isotonix® Calcium Plus

By Isotonix®

Sold by Isotonix®

AUD$41.00

AUD$0.75 Cashback

Single Bottle (90 Servings)

Benefits

  • A calcium supplement formulated to strengthen bone and tissue in growing and mature users
  • Supports skeletal health
  • Relief of muscular aches and pains
  • May help increase joint mobility associated with arthritis
  • May assist in the prevention and/or treatment osteoporosis
  • May assist in the management of sprains and soft tissue trauma
  • Relief and prevention of muscular cramps and spasms
  • Temporary relief of lower back pain*
  • May assist in peripheral blood circulation
  • May assist in the management of tenosynovitis
  • Source of calcium. Women’s calcium requirements are increased after menopause
  • For the symptomatic relief of fibromyalgia/m ay assist in the management of fibromyalgia
  • May assist in the management of menopause
  • May assist in the management of dysmenorrhoea*
  • Relief of menstrual cramps and symptoms
  • For the symptomatic relief of pre-menstrual tension/syndrome
  • May assist in the management of migraines and tension headaches*
  • Helps relieve and reduce the effects of nervous tension, stress, and mild anxiety
  • For the relief of irritability
  • For the symptomatic relief of stress disorders
  • May assist in the management of sciatica
  • This vegetarian product contains no added wheat, soy, yeast, gluten, artificial flavour, salt, preservatives or milk
  • Offered with the fastest and most efficient delivery system of all nutraceuticals

*If symptoms persist consult your healthcare practitioner.

Benefits  

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Product Classifications

Gluten-Free - the finished product contains no detectable gluten (<10ppm)

Vegetarian - Isotonix Calcium Plus is a vegetarian product

Isotonic-Capable Drinkable Supplements - easy-to-swallow supplements in liquid form are immediately available to the body for absorption

Product Classifications  

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Why choose Isotonix Calcium Plus?

Calcium is essential for building and maintaining strong bones. Isotonix Calcium Plus provides the body with an optimal blend of calcium, vitamin D3, magnesium, and vitamin C in an efficient isotonic solution that is readily absorbed by the body. It is also formulated to support your skeletal health, relieve of muscular aches and pains, increase joint mobility associated with arthritis, may assist in the prevention and/or treatment osteoporosis, temporary relieves of lower back pain among other benefits beyond your bones.

Isotonix Calcium Plus paves the way for powerful results since it is in an isotonic form rather than a tablet. Calcium in tablet form is difficult for your body to absorb. People may fail to absorb tablet calcium supplements because the calcium supplement is not blended with vitamin D and magnesium; these are necessary to aid in the absorption and use of calcium. Even if the calcium tablet is blended correctly, it may be difficult for the body to utilise or break down the calcium. One explanation may be that many calcium brands use calcium from eggshell or oyster shell. These may not be well absorbed by the body.

Another reason calcium may not be absorbed from a tablet is because of DCP, which is a binding agent used to hold the tablet together. DCP does not break down in the body. In addition to binders, some calcium supplements may have additives such as chlorine and other chemicals. Even assuming no binders are used in the calcium tablet, the body must still break down a hard-pressed tablet into a usable form. If the tablet cannot be broken down sufficiently in the stomach, then the calcium will not be absorbed. If you can't break down the calcium your body is robbed of the calcium needed to support bodily functions. Ordinary calcium tablets require stomach acid to dissolve its compounds, but Isotonix Calcium Plus has no need of stomach acid to be utilised because it delivers an efficient calcium solution that is more readily absorbed by the intestine with its unmatched isotonic delivery system – Isotonix.

Many calcium supplements exist in the marketplace, but only Market Australia's Isotonix Calcium Plus delivers a potent package of calcium and complementary nutrients through an isotonic system of delivery. This translates into a lower cost overall when compared to calcium supplements in pill form by making more of the active ingredients available to the body. Don't be misled by ingredient amounts. What really counts is the amount of active ingredients that your body can ultimately use.

Why choose Isotonix Calcium Plus?  

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Learn more about the benefits of Calcium

Isotonix Delivery System

Isotonix - the World's Most Advanced Nutraceuticals
Isotonic, which means “same pressure,” bears the same chemical resemblance of the body’s blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body’s common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body’s metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.

Isotonix Delivery System  

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Ingredients

Calcium (Carbonate, Lactate, Phosphate, Sulfate, Citrate)
The highest concentration of calcium is found in milk. Other foods rich in calcium include vegetables such as collard greens, Chinese cabbage, mustard greens, broccoli, bok choy and tofu. Calcium is an essential mineral with a wide range of biological roles. Calcium exists in bone primarily in the form of hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ). Hydroxyapatite accounts for approximately 40% of bone weight. The skeleton has a structural requisite and acts as a storehouse for calcium. Apart from being a major component of bones and teeth, calcium is necessary for muscle contraction, nerve health, normal heart rhythms, blood coagulation, glandular secretion, energy production and supporting the immune system.

Sufficient daily calcium intake is necessary for maintaining optimal bone density, healthy bones and teeth and has been shown to ease the discomfort of PMS in women. Calcium deficiency has been associated with poor cardiovascular health, poor colon health and poor muscular function. When the body does not get enough calcium per day, it draws calcium from your bones possibly resulting in Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is an age-related thinning of the bones, which may lead to a higher risk of broken hips, ribs, pelvis, weakened bones and stooped posture which comes from an accumulation of small fractures in the vertebrae.

Adequate calcium as part of a healthful diet, along with physical activity, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in later life. Bones become brittle with age, but calcium rich diet combined with some exercise can go a long way keep bones strong. The amount of calcium in the blood is regulated by PTH (parathyroid hormone). Some researchers believe when the body does not receive enough calcium, levels of PTH may increase, resulting in poor cardiovascular health. High levels of calcium in the body correlate with normal cardiovascular health and normal cholesterol levels. In the American Dietetic Association Journal a study revealed that calcium helped middle-aged women to maintain healthy weight levels.

Magnesium (Oxide, Carbonate
)
Foods rich in magnesium include unpolished grains, nuts and green vegetables. Green, leafy vegetables are potent sources of magnesium because of their chlorophyll content. Meats, starches, dairy products and refined and processed foods contain low amounts of magnesium. Recent research shows that our diets are magnesium deficient. Magnesium is a component of the mineralised part of bone and is necessary for the metabolism of potassium and calcium in adults. It helps maintain normal levels of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, adrenaline and insulin. It's also important for the transporting calcium inside the cell for utilisation.

Magnesium plays a key role in the functioning of muscle and nervous tissue and the synthesis of all proteins, nucleic acids, nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, lipids and carbohydrates. Magnesium helps slow the ageing process by combating oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. Magnesium is required for energy release, regulation of the body temperature, proper nerve function, helping the body handle stress, and regulating metabolism. Importantly, magnesium is also required by the body to build healthy bones and teeth and normalises muscle development. It works together with calcium and vitamin D to help keep bones strong and prevent osteoporosis. Magnesium, when combined with calcium, helps support the heart muscles in maintaining a regular heartbeat and promoting normal blood pressure.

Manganese (Sulfate)

Manganese is a mineral found in large quantities in both plant and animal matter. The most valuable dietary sources of manganese include whole grains, nuts, leafy vegetables and teas. Manganese is concentrated in the bran of grains, which is often removed during processing. Only trace amounts of this element can be found in human tissue. Manganese is predominantly stored in the bones, liver, kidney and pancreas. It aids in the formation of connective tissue, bones, blood-clotting factors and sex hormones.

It plays a role in fat and carbohydrate metabolism, calcium absorption and blood sugar regulation. Manganese is also necessary for normal brain and nerve function. Manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Antioxidants scavenge free radicals that can cause premature ageing and oxidative stress to the body. These particles occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes, interact with genetic material and possibly contribute to the ageing process. Antioxidants such as MnSOD can neutralise free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin-5-Phosphate)

Vitamin B2 is a found in liver, dairy products, dark green vegetables and some types of seafood. Vitamin B2 serves as a co-enzyme, working with other B vitamins. It promotes healthy red blood cell formation, supports the nervous system, respiration, antibody production and normal human growth. It supports healthy skin, nails, hair growth and helps regulate thyroid activity. Vitamin B2 plays a crucial role in turning food into energy as a part of the electron transport chain, driving cellular energy on the micro-level.

Riboflavin can be useful for pregnant or lactating women as well as athletes due to their higher caloric needs. Vitamin B2 aids in the breakdown of fats while functioning as a cofactor or helper in activating B6 and folic acid. Vitamin B2 is water-soluble and cannot be stored by the body except in insignificant amounts. It must be replenished daily. Under some conditions, vitamin B2 can act as an antioxidant. The riboflavin coenzymes are also important for the transformation of vitamin B6 and folic acid into their active forms and for the conversion of tryptophan into niacin.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

The best food sources of vitamin C include all citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit, lemons and tangerines), strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, brussel sprouts, peppers and cantaloupe. Vitamin C is a "fragile" vitamin and can be easily destroyed by cooking or exposure of food to oxygen. Vitamin C promotes a vitamin "sparing" effect, allowing your body to better utilise multiple vitamins and minerals such as thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, biotin, folic acid, B12, retinaldehyde and alpha-tocopherol and the mineral calcium. It's also a cofactor or helper in the metabolism of folic acid, some amino acids and hormones.

Being an effective antioxidant, it also works in helping generate more vitamin E after oxygen radicals have attacked it, improving iron absorption from the small intestine. Vitamin C helps to regenerate active vitamin E in cell membranes. It is a co-factor in the synthesis of collagen and helps strengthen newly forming collagen. Vitamin C supports cardiovascular health, normal cholesterol levels and supports a healthy immune system. Vitamin C has become the world's most popular vitamin. One reason is its ability to strengthen the immune system. The most convincing evidence suggesting the need for vitamin C supplementation is based on the fact that humans are incapable of producing vitamin C in their bodies. Smoking and some drugs may also impair the body's ability to absorb vitamin C. Since it is water-soluble, vitamin C is flushed from the body each day. Since humans don't always eat foods containing an adequate amount of vitamin C, it often is beneficial to take a supplement.

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol)

Regular sunlight exposure is the main way that most humans get their vitamin D. Food sources of vitamin D include vitamin D-fortified milk (100 IU per cup), cod liver oil, and fatty fish such as salmon and small amounts are found in egg yolks and liver. Vitamin D promotes the absorption of calcium and phosphorus and supports the production of several proteins involved in calcium absorption and storage. Vitamin D works with calcium to increase bone strength and harden the bones. It works to increase active transport of calcium out of the osteoblasts into the extra-cellular fluid and in the kidneys. It also promotes calcium and phosphate re-uptake through the renal tubules and intestinal epithelium. It supports normal skin cell growth and aids the pancreas in producing insulin. Also, adequate calcium and vitamin D as part of a healthful diet, along with physical activity, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in later life.

FAQ

Why should I take calcium?
Everyone needs calcium. Practically no one ingests enough calcium in their daily diet. Besides being helpful in supporting and maintaining bone integrity, calcium serves a dynamic role as a mineral. It's very important in the activity of many bodily enzymes and maintaining proper fluid balance. Calcium aids in the contraction of skeletal and muscle.

What are the directions for use?

Pour 1 (3.3 g) level, white bottle capful of powder into the overcap. Add water to the line on the overcap (60 ml) water and stir. As a dietary supplement, this product is best taken twice daily: one (1) capful in the morning and one (1) capful in the evening or as directed by your healthcare provider. Maximum absorption occurs when taken on an empty stomach. This product is isotonic only if the specified amounts of water and powder are used.

I'm not an elderly woman. Why should I take a calcium supplement?

Calcium plays a huge role in regulating many major bodily processes with implications that extend far beyond the age factor. Other than elderly women who may be susceptible to bone loss, younger women, pregnant and lactating women, growing children and men should take a calcium supplement. Younger women need more calcium to build up the strength of their bones. Pregnant and lactating women need extra calcium to foster the healthy growth of new cells and of breast milk. Growing children need extra calcium, sometimes two to four times as much as an adult to assist with new bone development and proper growth. Finally, those with poor cardiovascular health have been found to have low levels of calcium intake. Studies have confirmed the positive impact of calcium supplementation on heart health.

How can calcium help me lose weight?

Calcium plays a pivotal role within the body's cells, regulating both the storage and breakdown of fat. The more calcium there is in a fat cell, the more fat it will burn. Consuming dairy products has been shown to thwart weight gain. Calcium supplementation helps promote thermogenesis (fat burning).

I've heard calcium is great for PMS? How so?

PMS is an undesirable influence on physical and psychological peace of mind. Recent studies have found that over 70 percent of relationships are affected in some way by PMS. Supplementation with calcium can significantly reduce PMS symptoms. Ovarian hormones affect calcium, magnesium and vitamin D metabolism. Estrogen regulates calcium metabolism, intestinal calcium absorption and parathyroid gene expression and secretion, triggering fluctuations across the menstrual cycle. As a woman is menstruates, her hormones are "all over the place". Clinical trials in women with PMS have foundthat calcium supplementation effectively alleviates the majorityof mood and somatic symptoms.

What is the suggested age to begin taking Isotonix Calcium Plus?

Studies have shown that the most calcium absorption occurs in the early teen years.

Why is Isotonix Calcium Plus better than other calcium products?

It is better because of the Isotonix delivery system. When an isotonic substance enters the body, it will be absorbed into the bloodstream rapidly. With isotonic fluids, little nutritive value is lost making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient. There is nothing artificial about it. An isotonic fluid is nature's own nutrient delivery system.

Why is there a sandy residue left in the cup after mixing with water?

Everyone's water is different; some tap water has a higher concentration of minerals and the pH level of water differs depending on geographic location and the quality of the tap water, which can lead to inconsistencies with the saturation point of a solution. To ensure that our solutions reach the point of saturation, regardless of the pH or mineral levels in water, we have maximised the formulation amounts so that every serving of Isotonix Calcium Plus contains the correct amount of calcium. The residue left in the cup is due to over-saturation which is common in tap water with a higher pH level or a higher mineral content.

Who should use this product?

This product should be taken by women, especially those over the age of 20 to protect against the onset of osteoporosis. It is great for those who may be predisposed to bone loss or those who do not have an adequate intake of dairy products. It is necessary for growth and may be of special necessity for adolescents and pregnant females.

Science

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